Amazon Distribution Centres

Amazon Distribution Centres
Amazon Distribution Centres

They say it started off in the mid 1990’s. Based in Seattle, Amazon shared its office with a dog and shelves of books.

Amazon now have 100’s of warehouses, 10’s of 1,000’s employees and store 1,000,000,000’s of items. There is even a dedicated team who look after Distribution Centre tours.

The are called fulfilment centres as they not only store goods, they offer a fulfilment service; their associates, pick, pack and ship orders.

Amazon state that their fulfilment centres, can track millions of orders daily, fulfil the vision of their engineers and developers as well as career paths.

Amazon have more than 175 fulfilment centres around the world and 150 million square feet of warehousing space.

If you are looking for a cost effective alternative to Amazon, get in touch today!
Contact us for a full list of services.

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Amazon Repack Service

Amazon Repack Service
Amazon Repack Service

Amazon Repack Service bought to you by Storeship Limited is a cost effective alternative to storing all your items at Amazon’s own Distribution Centres.

Amazon charge a lot of money to store goods in their warehouses. By using our Amazon Repack Service, you will save yourself time and money. You may need to remove stock from Amazon, get it re-labelled and send it back in. This will appear as new stock as far as Amazon is concerned.

If you need to store goods with us to be feed into the Amazon Distribution Centres, our Amazon Repack Service is what you need, it is efficient and simple to use. Simply send us your request and your Amazon UPS labels, we’ll look after the rest!

Our Amazon Repack Service can be used in conjunction with your Amazon account or used as a stand alone service. We also offer our Amazon Order Fulfilment Service to compliment our Amazon Repack Service.

Amazon is a popular marketplace for selling online, we can obtain your orders throughout the day and our in-house I.T. system automatically downloads them into our own fulfilment software to be processed, packed and shipped the same day.

You can request a quote for our Amazon order fulfilment service by using the form on our contact page or alternatively feel free to call one of our sales staff to discuss your personal requirements.

Get in touch today and find out how easy it is for you to work with us!

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We are hiring – Warehouse Manager

Warehouse Manager- Full-time permanent. Nottingham

Storeship is an expanding fulfilment warehouse business based in the Nottingham, UK.

Operating from premises in New Basford, Nottingham. Storeship are industry leaders in the eCommerce Fulfilment Services marketplace. Small, medium and large eCommerce businesses rely on us as their 3PL partner. New Basford has easy links to local trams and buses.

Due to continued expansion we are currently recruiting for an experienced Warehouse Supervisor / Manager to lead the small warehouse team and liaise with senior management.

As this is a new position, we are looking for someone who will be able to get involved in all aspects of the warehouse. We are looking for a person who can motivate their staff, has a keen eye for detail and would like to expand on their previous warehouse experience. You will need to be a leader of people, be able to motivate, train and encourage all team members. We are constantly evolving as a business so you must be flexible in your approach. You must be computer literate and full training will be given with our Warehouse Management System.

Primary Accountability:

The Warehouse Supervisor is responsible for all shipping, receiving, and picking operations, customer service and personnel within the warehouse. Key accountabilities are accuracy, efficiency, and customer satisfaction.

Main Duties:

  • Hire, train, guides and develops staff.
  • Creates and holds staff accountable for Key Performance objectives.
  • Maintain staff training manual and develop regular appraisals.
  • Evaluates the performance of staff within direct supervision and recommends performance improvement procedures as necessary.
  • Identify and improve processes to increase efficiency and minimise mistakes.
  • Improve customer engagement by providing a positive customer pickup experience.
  • Ensure smooth flow of goods in and out movement.
  • Ensure safe and intuitive storage of goods.
  • Maintain inventory integrity within our in-house WMS by ensuring all inventory transactions are accounted for in the database.
  • Ensure that all orders are picked and packed accurately.
  • Ensure accountability of accurate customer billing and allocation.
  • Organise warehouse and keep free of clutter.

Qualifications

  • Demonstrated leadership experience within a high functioning, fast paced warehouse environment.
  • Minimum of 3 years experience in a similar role.
  • Strong interpersonal communication skills and the ability to establish and maintain effective working relationships.
  • Ability to effectively communicate, present information and respond to questions both verbal and written.
  • Ability to drive a forklift and complete forklift certification course. Full training will be considered.
  • Experience with Domestic and International shipping processes, forms, and best practices.
  • Strong proficiency with systems including MS Office, database management, and carrier portals.
  • Experience with a pick/pack fulfilment type operation.
  • Strong attention to detail and ability to work quickly while maintaining a high-priority to the safety of our workforce.

40 hours per week. Shifts to cover the opening hours are expected. The warehouse is open from 7.30am to 5.00pm Monday to Friday. Saturday may be expected in the future. Overtime may be necessary from time to time.

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Crowd Funding Fulfilment

Crowdfunding Fulfilment
Crowdfunding Fulfilment

If you’ve got backers, you need Storeship Fulfilment Services!

Over a period of time we have perfected our process for fulfilling large crowdfunding campaigns enabling us to offer special discounted rates for these projects.

Imagine if you have spent all your time producing a unique product, getting listed on Kickstarter or Indiegogo and you have reached your target. Suddenly you’ll have (hopefully) 1000’s of products that will need to be dispatched across the globe as soon as you’ve reached your target.

For larger crowd funding campaigns, we would bring in extra resource to ensure that your products get dispatched as soon as possible.

Make sure you are prepared for your successful Crowd Funding Campaign by using Storeship Fulfilment Services.

Get in touch today and find out how easy it is for you to work with us!

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Subscription Box Fulfilment

Subscription Boxes by Storeship
Storeship can easily fulfil all eCommerce Subscription services

Subscription Boxes are becoming more and more popular!

If you use this method of sales for your business then our service is especially for you.  As part of your marketing strategy and as a method of product distribution. Once you’ve decided on your subscription items, simply send us your stock and we’ll arrange integration of your eCommerce platform. Most people opt for a continuous subscription so there’s something to look forward to every month, but other options often include a one-off purchase, or 3 and 6-month subscriptions. Whatever you decide, we can accommodate.

Think about the size of your final package. Can it go through the letter box? Best if it can!

Subscription boxes can range from all items including;

  • Biscuits,
  • Grooming Products,
  • Underwear, (Yes, we have an underwear subscription customer!)
  • Baby products,
  • Games,
  • Mystery Products,
  • Books and more…

Make sure you are hitting the trend for Storeship Fulfilled Subscription Boxes!

Get in touch today and find out how easy it is for you to work with us!

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National Trading Standards – Online sales of age-restricted products

This guidance is for England & Wales

Selling age-restricted products via the internet presents particular issues and retailers must have effective systems in place for preventing sales to prospective customers who are underage.

This guide applies to all products that have age restrictions on sales, such as alcohol, tobacco, spray paints, fireworks, and video recordings and games.

Duty of retailers

It is the responsibility of retailers to ensure they do not sell age-restricted products online to people who are under the minimum legal age. This means setting up effective systems capable of verifying the age of potential purchasers to ensure they are above the minimum legal age to purchase a product. When making an assessment of such systems account should be taken of legal requirements to take all reasonable precautions and to exercise all due diligence to avoid committing an offence. These legal requirements are a retailer’s defence in consumer protection legislation.

Such systems should be regularly monitored and updated as necessary, to identify and rectify any problems or weaknesses in the system or to keep pace with advances in available technology.

There is no definitive answer as to what constitutes taking all reasonable precautions or exercising all due diligence. However, past court case decisions in relation to other areas of consumer protection have established that a retailer’s defence is more likely to fail if positive steps or precautions are not taken, resulting in a conviction.

Risk analysis, including the investigation of the options available to overcome risks, is required to identify and investigate what precautions and steps could be taken.

Checks unlikely to satisfy ‘due diligence’

Retailers should take positive steps to verify the age of the purchaser when selling age-restricted products. The following are examples that are unlikely to be enough to satisfy the requirements of taking all reasonable precautions and exercising all due diligence:

  • relying on the purchaser confirming they are over the minimum age
  • asking the purchaser simply to provide a date of birth
  • using tick boxes to ask purchasers to confirm they are over the minimum age
  • using a general disclaimer such as: ‘Anyone ordering this product from our website will be deemed to be at least 18’
  • using an ‘accept’ statement for the purchaser to confirm that they have read the terms and conditions and are over the minimum age
  • using e-payment services such as PayPal, Nochex or Worldpay. These services may require a customer to be over 18, but they may not verify a user’s age
  • only accepting payment by credit card. Credit cards are not available to under 18s but certain debit and prepaid cards are. Your payment systems are unlikely to be able to differentiate between the different types of card so it is essential that you have additional age verification in place

Young people will seek to challenge conventions and test boundaries. In the case of online sales, young people could potentially evade the stringent proof-of-age checks that are required on the high street unless retailers make positive checks.

Age verification checks

The following is a guide to possible steps and precautions that retailers could adopt to assist with age verification. However, it should be noted that these may not be suitable for some situations and retailers will need to assess what steps are suitable and appropriate to their individual circumstances. Retailers may be able to develop other methods of age verification.

Age verification concepts in a fast moving digital world are challenging in terms of effectiveness. No system is failsafe and any service that relies on remote verification has the potential for errors.

Many websites now require purchasers to register details or to set up accounts for future purchases, which means that age verification checks may only be required for the initial set-up of accounts or on the first purchase from the website.

Age verification on delivery

Retailers could use age verification checks at the point of delivery by ensuring that delivery drivers request valid proof of age to confirm that the purchaser is over the minimum age to buy the product in question. It should be noted that third-party couriers may not accept responsibility for age verification.

Online age verification checks

Online age verification software is available that makes use of various sources of information in order to verify both age and identity during the ordering process. These checks include using the electoral register and/or credit reference agencies. There are also businesses that offer online access to electoral register information, which could be used to verify a purchaser’s age.

Follow-up offline checks

In some circumstances, it may not be possible to verify a potential purchaser’s age to conclude an online order. It is there suggested that further checks could be carried out, such as requiring the customer to provide a valid / acceptable proof of age, which can then be appropriately checked.

Collect in-store

For some retailers that also have a high street presence, purchasers could view and reserve products online and then collect in-store, where age verification could be carried out by members of staff as with a normal face-to-face transaction.

Further information

It is the responsibility of the retailer to ensure that products are only sold to purchasers old enough to buy them. If there is any doubt the transaction should not proceed.

The above guidance is applicable to all products that are subject to age-restricted sales. These include alcohol, tobacco, spray paints, fireworks, and video recordings and games.

A PAS (publically available specification) has been published, which was developed by the Digital Policy Alliance and BSI (British Standards Institution). PAS 1296: Online age checking. Provision and use of online age check services. Code of Practice is designed to help traders, particularly those that conduct age checks or provide age check services, to comply with the law.

Penalties

Failure to comply with trading standards law can lead to enforcement action and to sanctions, which may include a fine and/or imprisonment.

Key legislation

Children and Young Persons Act 1933

Video Recordings Act 1984

Criminal Justice Act 1988

Children and Young Persons (Protection From Tobacco) Act 1991

National Lottery etc Act 1993

National Lottery Regulations 1994

Offensive Weapons Act 1996

Cigarette Lighter Refill (Safety) Regulations 1999

Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003

Licensing Act 2003

Fireworks Regulations 2004

Gambling Act 2005

Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006

Pyrotechnic Articles (Safety) Regulations 2015

PLEASE NOTE

The information is intended for guidance only; only the courts can give you an authoritative interpretation of the law.

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National Trading Standards – Leather Goods

This guidance is for England, Scotland & Wales

Any consumer product made of leather – for example, clothing, shoes, bags, belts, furniture, soft furnishings, and even equine equipment, such as saddles and bridles – is subject to controls on the chemicals that may be present as a result of the tanning process. Chemicals such as azo dyes, chromium VI and dimethyl fumarate (DMF) have previously been found to be present in leather goods and are now restricted under regulations due to the health hazards they pose to consumers.

If you are not the manufacturer or importer, you should check with your supplier that the products comply with the Regulations. This could involve asking to see test certificates, or auditing your suppliers if you are a large retailer. If you are a manufacturer or importer, you would normally be expected to have tested your products to ensure that they comply.

The legislation

EU Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulates the use of azo dyes, chromium VI and dimethyl fumarate (DMF).

Anyone who supplies consumer leather products intended to come into direct and prolonged contact with the skin, and that may contain any of these chemicals, will be affected by the Regulation. Examples are as follows:

  • clothing
  • hats
  • footwear
  • gloves
  • wristwatch straps
  • handbags
  • purses
  • toys containing leather
  • furniture
  • soft furnishings
  • equine equipment, such as saddles and bridles

Azo dyes, chromium VI & dimethyl fumarate

Azo dyes are organic compounds. Azo dyes are used to treat textiles, leather articles and some foods. Some – such as dinitroanline orange, ortho nitroaniline orange, or pigment orange 1, 2, and 5 – are mutagenic and carcinogenic. Azo dyes derived from benzidine are carcinogens.

Tanning is the process of making raw hides or skins into leather. The majority of leathers used in furniture, gloves and footwear are tanned using chromium salts. Contact with the skin can cause burns and contact-dermatitis allergic reactions, which appear as reddening of the skin, itching and rashes.

Chromium VI is a skin sensitiser; future reactions can be caused when only a very small amount is in contact with the skin. There are also dangers from ingestion. This is a particularly important hazard to assess for young children’s toys or clothing where there is a risk of mouthing. Studies have shown the ingestion of chromium VI may affect the liver, kidneys and the immune system.

DMF is used as a biocide in leather products, such as furniture or shoes, to prevent growths of mould during storage or transport in a humid climate. DMF has been found to be an allergic sensitiser at very low concentrations, producing an eczema reaction that is difficult to treat. Concentrations as low as 1ppm may produce allergic reactions.

Azo dyes in products

Azo dyes, which may release one or more listed aromatic amines above 30 mg/kg (0.003% by weight), must not be used in articles that may come into direct and prolonged contact with the human skin or oral cavity – for example:

  • clothing
  • hats
  • footwear
  • gloves
  • wristwatch straps
  • handbags
  • purses / wallets (including those worn around the neck)
  • briefcases
  • purses
  • leather toys and toys that include leather garments

Leather articles must not be placed on the market unless they conform to these requirements.

Chromium VI in products

Leather articles or articles containing leather parts coming into contact with the skin must not be placed on the market where they contain chromium VI in concentrations equal to or greater than 3 mg/kg (0.0003% by weight) of the total dry weight of the leather.

Dimethyl fumarate in products

Leather products containing the biocide DMF in concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/kg must not be placed on the market.

Second-hand leather goods

For products sold second-hand, the General Product Safety Regulations 2005 apply. These require goods supplied to be safe so the restrictions will still apply.

What should I do to make sure I comply?

If you are not the manufacturer or importer you should check with your supplier that the products comply with the Regulations. This could involve asking to see test certificates, or auditing your suppliers if you are a large retailer. How much you need to do depends on a number of circumstances – for example, the size of your business – but doing nothing will not be sufficient.

If you are a manufacturer or importer, you would normally be expected to have tested your products to ensure that they comply. It is recommended that a reputable test house should carry out any testing, such as one accredited by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS).

Penalties

Failure to comply with trading standards law can lead to enforcement action and to sanctions, which may include a fine and/or imprisonment.

Key legislation

General Product Safety Regulations 2005

EU Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) 

REACH Enforcement Regulations 2008

PLEASE NOTE

The information is intended for guidance only; only the courts can give you an authoritative interpretation of the law.

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National Trading Standards – Mini motos, off-road vehicles, etc

This guidance is for England, Scotland & Wales

Off-road vehicles – such as mini motorbikes, quad bikes and powered scooters – are popular as recreational vehicles for both adults and children. As a wider variety of vehicles have become available at affordable prices, concerns have been raised about vehicle safety and associated nuisance and anti-social behaviour.

When assessing the safety of a product a number of matters are taken into consideration and anyone in the supply chain, including retailers, can be held liable for the supply of unsafe products.

Traders should carry out basic checks on vehicles before supply, including checking the frame is not damaged, that nuts and bolts are secure, tyres are properly inflated, and steering is aligned. The vehicle sold must be of satisfactory quality, fit for purpose and as described. There are rules relating to the legal and illegal use of off-road vehicles, which should be passed on to the consumer.

Product safety

The law requires that any product sold to consumers must be safe. Products should not present any unnecessary risk to anyone when used in a normal or reasonably foreseeable way. When assessing the safety of a product, the following must be taken into account:

  • the packaging, labelling and instructions
  • the effect of the product on other products with which it might be used
  • the special needs of particular types of people, such as children

Where there are national, European or international standards relating to the product, these standards will also need to be taken into account.

Anyone in the supply chain, including retailers, can be held liable for the supply of unsafe products. In general, it is a criminal offence to supply unsafe products and you could also be liable to pay compensation for any injury or property-damage caused.

You should be prepared to carry out checks on the product and/or on your suppliers to ensure product safety. Doing nothing is not enough.

Special safety requirements

The CE mark is placed on a product by the manufacturer as confirmation that it complies with all the relevant safety standards

CE mark

Off-road vehicles are covered by the Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations 2008. They specifically exclude vehicles that are intended for use in competitions or on the road. Compliance with the health and safety requirements of these Regulations can be achieved by manufacturing to European or British standards.

The European Standard BS EN 16029: Ride-on motorised vehicles intended for the transportation of persons and not intended for use on public roads. Single-track two-wheel motor vehicles. Safety requirements and test methods is currently under review. This Standard could be taken into account when assessing whether the product complies with the Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations 2008.

All vehicles that are covered by the Regulations will need to be CE-marked and comply with the health and safety requirements outlined in the Regulations.

Particular safety concerns

As a retailer, you may not have the same degree of technical knowledge and expertise as a manufacturer or importer. However, you may be able to carry out certain checks on the safety of off-road vehicles. All off-road vehicles subject to the Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations 2008 must be accompanied by a declaration of conformity drawn up by the manufacturer. This specifies, amongst other things, which standards the off-road vehicle complies with. It is an offence not to provide the declaration of conformity with the machine.

Additionally, you should ensure that each vehicle is supplied with adequate written instructions. If you rely only on verbal instructions it will be very difficult to prove what you have said and your instructions may not reach the end user (if the vehicle is a gift, for example). If there are parts of the instructions that have a particular relevance to safety, you may wish to highlight them.

You should also examine each vehicle before you supply it and carry out basic checks – for example:

  • all fixings, nuts and bolts are correctly and securely fastened
  • the frame is not damaged
  • the condition and inflation of tyres
  • brakes are working effectively
  • no sharp edges and entrapment hazards
  • no leaks in the fuel system
  • make sure that the steering is aligned
  • ensure all hot surfaces, such as exhausts, are guarded

You may wish to offer advice on the appropriate safety equipment that needs to be used with the vehicle, such as a helmet and suitable clothing, and to offer to supply this equipment. Any such advice should also be included in the written instructions.

Under the Consumer Rights Act 2015, the goods you sell must be of satisfactory quality, fit for their purpose and as described. If a vehicle is intended to be ridden off-road, it should be sufficiently robust to provide a reasonable service life. A consumer might reasonably expect to replace some parts from time to time – due to ordinary wear and tear –  but they would probably expect the vehicle to be able to cope with rough terrain.

If a vehicle fails prematurely, the consumer may be entitled to claim their losses from the retailer. This could include a repair, replacement, full or partial refund and/or compensation.

If the manufacturer offers a guarantee, remember that this does not take away a consumer’s rights. Your consumer may still have a claim against you even after the manufacturer’s guarantee has expired.

llegal use of off-road vehicles: information for your consumers

Off-road vehicles cannot be used on the public highway. Furthermore, under the Road Traffic Act 1988 (and related legislation) motorised vehicles cannot be used anywhere off-road, except on private land with the landowner’s permission. This means that mini motorbikes and quad bikes cannot legally be used on pavements, footpaths or cycle paths; nor can they usually be used on parkland, common land or wasteland.

There are also provisions in law against nuisance, including noise nuisance caused by the inappropriate or illegal use of off-road vehicles. In some cases the police can impound and even destroy vehicles that are being used in an anti-social manner.

There are special tracks and facilities for off-road vehicle use, but your consumer may not live near to one of these, or they may find it difficult to transport a vehicle there.

Consumers may not be fully aware of the legal restrictions that apply to the use of off-road vehicles. They may well be disappointed if they buy a vehicle, expecting to be able to ride it on a local park or common, only to find out later that they cannot do so. It would therefore be advisable to check with your consumer, at least in general terms, that they understand where and how the vehicles can be used.

Under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008, retailers are obliged to disclose information that might affect a consumer’s decision to buy, even if the consumer does not ask for it. You should therefore make it clear to prospective customers that the vehicle can only be used on private land, and then only with the landowner’s permission and if it does not cause a nuisance.

Trading standards services are aware of a number of cases where off-road vehicles have been badged with the name of a famous motorcycle manufacturer, even though that manufacturer had no involvement in their production. If you are offered the chance to supply such vehicles, you should make checks with the manufacturer’s UK representatives to find out whether the vehicles are genuine. If they are not, please report the supplier to trading standards; the products might also be dangerous.

Petrol cannot be sold to children under 16 years of age. If you are supplying a vehicle for use by children, we would recommend that you remind your customers of this.

Outside the scope of this guide

If you are importing off-road vehicles into the EU, to sell at retail or wholesale, you may need to take specialist advice from your local trading standards service.

Vehicles that are sold for use both on and off the road (such as some quad bikes) are designed to comply with the regulations that deal with the construction and use of vehicles on the road. To be used on the road, of course, the vehicles and riders will require the correct form of licence and insurance.

Penalties

Failure to comply with trading standards law can lead to enforcement action and to sanctions, which may include a fine and/or imprisonment.

Key legislation

Road Traffic Act 1988

Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008

Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations 2008

Consumer Rights Act 2015

PLEASE NOTE

The information is intended for guidance only; only the courts can give you an authoritative interpretation of the law.

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National Trading Standards – Labelling of Footwear

This guidance is for England, Scotland & Wales

Footwear must be labelled with an indication of the main material from which the upper, lining and sock, and outer sole are made in the form of either pictograms (symbols) or words.

The label should be attached to at least one item of footwear per pair and it may also appear on the packaging.

What do the Regulations cover?

The Footwear (Indication of Composition) Labelling Regulations 1995 apply to footwear of all descriptions ranging from simple sandals to thigh-length boots, with the exception of:

  • second-hand or worn footwear
  • protective footwear
  • footwear containing asbestos
  • footwear intended for use in play (for example, fancy dress) by children under 14

Who is responsible for the labelling?

It is the responsibility of the manufacturer or importer to ensure that footwear is correctly labelled and to supply accurate labels that are not misleading.

It is the responsibility of the retailer to ensure that the footwear they sell is labelled correctly, in accordance with the Regulations. It is therefore recommended that retailers have a system in place for checking footwear labelling before it goes on sale, and that these checks are recorded. Retailers can get information about the composition of footwear they sell from manufacturers or importers.

Labelling requirements

The label must state, in English or in a clear pictogram form, what material makes up 80% of:

  • the surface area of the upper
  • the surface area of the lining and sock (this means the lining of the upper and the insole, which constitutes the inside of the footwear article)
  • the outer sole

Where there are multiple materials used the two main materials in the composition of the footwear must be stated.

The label must be attached to at least one item of footwear in each pair and may be affixed by way of printing, sticking, embossing or use of an attached label; it must be visible, securely attached and accessible. The label may be on the packaging but it must also appear on the footwear itself.

If pictograms are used in a retail shop a notice must be displayed that explains to consumers what the symbols mean. The notice must be large enough so that the information can be seen and understood by consumers.

If pictogram labels are used where footwear is sold from a place consumers do not have access to (for example, mail order or internet sales) the consumer must be clearly informed of the meaning of the pictograms used.

Table showing the written indications or pictograms concerning the parts of the footwear:

Parts of footwear
upper: Footwear upper label
lining and sock: Footwear lining and sock label
outer sole: Footwear outer sole label

Table showing the written indications or pictograms concerning the materials used in footwear composition:

Materials used
leather: Footwear leather label
coated leather: Footwear coated leather label
textile: Footwear textile label
other materials: Footwear other materials label

Penalties

Failure to comply with trading standards law can lead to enforcement action and to sanctions, which may include a fine and/or imprisonment.

Key legislation

Footwear (Indication of Composition) Labelling Regulations 1995

Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008

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